Publications

EDUCATION AND HEALH CARE

September-October 2017   |   Volume 98, Number 5

Teaching the Art of Collaborative Practice

1709_HP_CoverBY: DAVID POLE, PhD, MPH, and FRED ROTTNEK, MD, MAHCM
Safety is a core value of Catholic health care so deeply embedded that it seldom appears on lists of values or in mission statements. But safety in modern health care delivery is not a given. Health care is so complex, and so many people may be involved in a patient's care in so many ways — physical, virtual or financial, for example — that in acute and long-term care settings, dozens of people might "touch" a patient or a patient's case during a single day. These "touches" all can have an impact on care and outcomes.
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Fill Vacancies and Address DiversityFill Vacancies and Address Diversity: A Catholic Higher Education Imperative

BY: BETH A. BROOKS, PhD, RN, FACHE; BARBARA Q. DECKER, JD; BO BONNER, MDiv; and RYAN MARR, PhD

The need to expand health care education in the United States is critical, not just to fill the growing number of job vacancies in the health care sector, but to diversify the health care workforce.
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Health Systems, Schools Seek Student Strategies

BY: JOHN MORRISSEY
Catholic health care faces a growing shortage of key professionals. Catholic higher education, to reduce that shortage, needs to produce professionals that match what the health care field requires of today's workforce. Students seeking health care training worry and are wary about the financial hole they're digging to pursue studies. That wariness can become a drag on student population for those colleges, which can become a drag on the supply of those key professionals. The problem is interconnected.
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Clinical Ethics Consultations

BY: KEVIN FITZGERALD, SJ, PhD, PhD
In its "Shared Statement of Identity for the Catholic Health Ministry," the Catholic Health Association states, "By our service, we strive to transform hurt into hope." The hurt that people experience from illness and injury can be so overwhelming and complex that it is not always clear how we in Catholic health care might best strive to bring hope to our patients and their loved ones. At times, this lack of clarity can involve uncertainty or disagreement among medical staff and the patient and family regarding what the best care plan should be. To assist with the resolution of such disagreements, most health care institutions in the U.S. offer ethics consultation services to help guide the decision-making process.
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Two Catholic Universities Build Osteopathy SchoolsTwo Catholic Universities Build Osteopathy Schools

BY: DAVID LEWELLEN
Nick Salupo enrolled in Marian University's first class of osteopathic medical students almost by accident. But now he sees a purpose to it. "The faculty wanted us to help in what they were building. There was a sense of ownership," said Salupo, who earned his DO degree in May 2017. He is beginning a family practice residency in Indianapolis, not far from the campus of the expanding Franciscan university. "It had a small liberal arts vibe to it, but it was a medical school," he said.
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Humility: An Indispensable Virtue to Learn for Practicing with Excellence

BY: PAUL J. WADELL, PhD
It is impossible for doctors, nurses, medical technicians, chaplains, social workers and administrators — or anyone else in health care — to achieve excellence without cultivating the virtue of humility.
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Medical Schools Need Still More Women in LeadershipMedical Schools Need Still More Women in Leadership

BY: KATHERINE McDANIEL, PhD
Two years ago, when I was weighing the pros and cons of relocating to a new state for a job that I hoped would propel me further in my career, I looked at several factors. The idea of moving away from friends, family and a city I'd lived in for the last decade weighed heavily on my decision. But so did the reality that my job did not offer many avenues for advancement.
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How Education Will Influence Mission IdentityHow Education Will Influence Mission Identity

BY: TINA HOLLAND, PhD
The education and formation of professionals for service in Catholic health care will influence the future culture and mission identity of Catholic health care organizations. Therefore, mission and the way it shapes the students' experience is crucial to the overall preparation of future health care professionals.
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Ambulatory Clinic Teaches Team Care

Ambulatory Clinic Teaches Team Care

BY: SONJA CARBERRY
At 9 a.m. on a Tuesday, when a patient sat down in an exam room at CHI Health Creigh-ton University Medical Center–University Campus in Omaha, Nebraska, her care already was in motion. On the other side of the exam room door, an interprofessional team of care providers, along with students from various health professions, already had huddled to discuss the day. It's a quick and productive discussion, with input from faculty physicians, residents, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, dietitians, behavioral health specialists and learners. After talking about safety issues and recognizing individual successes, smaller teams gather to discuss the patients they will see that morning.
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Online Nursing Education: Virtual Classrooms and Clinical Simulations Help Meet Student Needs

BY: MARY ELLEN SMITH GLASGOW, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, ANEF, FAAN; JOAN SUCH LOCKHART, PhD, RN, CORLN, AOCN, ANEF, FAAN; and DAVID A. NOLFI, MLS, AHIP

Over the last two decades, nursing not only has been a leader in online education, but the online environment has become a staple. Online learning has matured from a basic discussion board in 1997 to virtual classrooms and simulations, and it has grown in enrollment and acceptance.1 It is especially appealing to nursing students who otherwise might be unable to pursue their education because of family and work demands, or because they live too far from a school to attend classes.
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FEATURE

Continuum Includes Behavioral Health Care

BY: ROBERT ROOSE, MD, MPH, FASAM
Caring for the whole person is an essential tradition of Catholic health care. Health ministries across the globe share the core value of promoting and protecting human dignity, inclusive of biological, psychological, social and spiritual self.
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Moving Forward in the Spirit - Spirituality and the Search for Christian Unity

BY:  JOHN W. CROSSIN, OSFS, PhD
The Second Vatican Council's Decree on Ecumenism (Unitatis Redintegratio, 1964) committed the Catholic Church to the search for Christian unity.1 Pope John Paul II in his encyclical On Commitment to Ecumenism (Ut Unum Sint, 1995) spoke of this irrevocable commitment in great depth.2 Many of the walls have come down between Catholics and Protestant, Anglican and Orthodox Christians. How is this commitment to ecumenism lived out in a Catholic health care setting today?
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DEPARTMENTS

Editor's Note

BY: MARY ANN STEINER


Mission and Leadership - Story, Formation and Belonging to Something Bigger

BY: BRIAN P. SMITH, MS, MA, MDiv


Ethics - Heartbreaking Cases Test Ethics and Public Policy

BY: FR. CHARLES BOUCHARD, OP, STD


Community Benefit - Charting a Course to Community Health: A Governance Priority

BY: MICHAEL D. CONNELLY, MA, JD, LFACHE; and LAWRENCE D. PRYBIL, PhD, LFACHE


Thinking Globally - Short-Term Missions Need a Framework

BY: BRUCE COMPTON