Meeting

A Discussion of Why Organized Medicine Must Maintain Its Opposition to Assisted Suicide

October 24, 2019, 2:00 PM - October 24, 2019, 3:00 PM Eastern Time

Member Price: $0.00
Non-Member Price: $100.00
$100.00

If you would like to register by phone, please call us at (800) 230-7823 (M-F, 8 AM to 5 PM Central).

Description

Physician-assisted suicide is now legal in 10 states and efforts are underway to legalize the practice across the country. State and national health professional societies are powerful voices in this debate because they represent the people who directly care for the sick and dying and would play a key role in hastening the deaths of patients who request physician-assisted suicide. The positions these societies adopt on physician-assisted suicide signal to policymakers and the public whether the practice is ethically acceptable and in the best interest of the patient.

In a May 2018 article for the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Daniel Sulmasy, MD, and others argue that when organized medicine changes its stance on physician-assisted suicide from opposed to neutral, it "represents a substantive shift in a professional, ethical and political position, declaring a policy no longer morally unacceptable; the political effect is to give it a green light." In this webinar, Sulmasy will review why this shift is at odds with the ethical and professional integrity of the medical and nursing professions and how it can put broader society at risk by eroding patient trust in the health care system and normalizing suicide. He will also discuss developments in palliative and end-of-life care and the responsibility of health care nursing professionals to advocate for adequate resources for end-of-life care.

Objectives

After this webinar participants will:

  • Understand the ethical, professional and societal issues physicians and nurses need to consider when their professional societies ask membership to vote on adopting a neutral position on assisted suicide.
  • Understand the political nature of this issue, both in professional societies and in the broader public policy process, and the importance of the clinician’s voice/perspective in advocating for high-quality care for seriously ill and dying patients.
  • Understand how to evaluate and interpret the data and views being presented on the perceived acceptance of assisted-suicide among physicians and the public.

Speaker

Daniel P. Sulmasy, MD, Ph.D., MACP
André Hellegers Professor of Biomedical Ethics
Georgetown University Medical Center

Dr. Sulmasy, MD, Ph.D., MACP, is the André Hellegers Professor of Biomedical Ethics in the Departments of Medicine and Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he is acting director of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and a member of the Pellegrino Center for Clinical Bioethics. He received his AB and MD degrees from Cornell University; completed his residency, chief residency and post-doctoral fellowship in General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins Hospital; and holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Georgetown. Sulmasy previously held faculty positions at New York Medical College and the University of Chicago. He has also served on numerous governmental advisory committees and was a member of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues from 2010 to 2017. His research interests encompass theoretical and empirical investigations of the ethics of end-of-life decision-making, informed consent for research and spirituality in medicine. Sulmasy is the author or editor of six books: The Healer’s Calling; Methods in Medical Ethics; The Rebirth of the Clinic; A Balm for Gilead; Safe Passage: A Global Spiritual Sourcebook for Care at the End of Life; and Francis the Leper: Faith, Medicine, Theology, and Science. He also serves as editor-in-chief of the journal Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics .

Who Should Attend

This webinar will be useful for the following groups:

  • Physicians
  • Nurses
  • CMOs/CNOs
  • Ethicists
  • Advocacy/Government Relations

Physician-assisted suicide is now legal in 10 states and efforts are underway to legalize the practice across the country. State and national health professional societies are powerful voices in this debate because they represent the people who directly care for the sick and dying and would play a key role in hastening the deaths of patients who request physician-assisted suicide. The positions these societies adopt on physician-assisted suicide signal to policymakers and the public whether the practice is ethically acceptable and in the best interest of the patient.

In a May 2018 article for the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Daniel Sulmasy, MD, and others argue that when organized medicine changes its stance on physician-assisted suicide from opposed to neutral, it "represents a substantive shift in a professional, ethical and political position, declaring a policy no longer morally unacceptable; the political effect is to give it a green light." In this webinar, Sulmasy will review why this shift is at odds with the ethical and professional integrity of the medical and nursing professions and how it can put broader society at risk by eroding patient trust in the health care system and normalizing suicide. He will also discuss developments in palliative and end-of-life care and the responsibility of health care nursing professionals to advocate for adequate resources for end-of-life care.

Objectives

After this webinar participants will:

  • Understand the ethical, professional and societal issues physicians and nurses need to consider when their professional societies ask membership to vote on adopting a neutral position on assisted suicide.
  • Understand the political nature of this issue, both in professional societies and in the broader public policy process, and the importance of the clinician’s voice/perspective in advocating for high-quality care for seriously ill and dying patients.
  • Understand how to evaluate and interpret the data and views being presented on the perceived acceptance of assisted-suicide among physicians and the public.

Speaker

Daniel P. Sulmasy, MD, Ph.D., MACP
André Hellegers Professor of Biomedical Ethics
Georgetown University Medical Center

Dr. Sulmasy, MD, Ph.D., MACP, is the André Hellegers Professor of Biomedical Ethics in the Departments of Medicine and Philosophy at Georgetown University, where he is acting director of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and a member of the Pellegrino Center for Clinical Bioethics. He received his AB and MD degrees from Cornell University; completed his residency, chief residency and post-doctoral fellowship in General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins Hospital; and holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Georgetown. Sulmasy previously held faculty positions at New York Medical College and the University of Chicago. He has also served on numerous governmental advisory committees and was a member of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues from 2010 to 2017. His research interests encompass theoretical and empirical investigations of the ethics of end-of-life decision-making, informed consent for research and spirituality in medicine. Sulmasy is the author or editor of six books: The Healer’s Calling; Methods in Medical Ethics; The Rebirth of the Clinic; A Balm for Gilead; Safe Passage: A Global Spiritual Sourcebook for Care at the End of Life; and Francis the Leper: Faith, Medicine, Theology, and Science. He also serves as editor-in-chief of the journal Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics .

Who Should Attend

This webinar will be useful for the following groups:

  • Physicians
  • Nurses
  • CMOs/CNOs
  • Ethicists
  • Advocacy/Government Relations


Please note: All times listed are Eastern Time.
Overview
Registration Fee:  

If you would like to register
by phone, please call us at
800-230-7823 (M-F, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central).