Centennial Timeline

Throughout its history, the Catholic Health Association has grown and changed as its members have grown and adapted to the needs of their communities. For all of its 100 years, CHA has raised a passionate voice for compassionate care.

Photo credits

Last Updated: January 30, 2015

1910s

  1. 1914

    First meeting about establishing an organization of Catholic hospitals.

    1914

    First meeting about establishing an organization of Catholic hospitals.

    Rev. Charles B. Moulinier, SJ, and 14 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet met in St. Paul, Minn., to discuss Fr. Moulinier’s idea of establishing an organization of Catholic hospitals. He had perceived the need for a strong and prompt response to the growing public demands that hospitals raise their standards of care. (Photo: Cottage porch in Minneapolis where an association of Catholic hospitals was planned.)

  2. 1915

    The Catholic Hospital Association is founded.

    1915

    The Catholic Hospital Association is founded.

    The Catholic Hospital Association was founded at a meeting April 8, 1915, at Marquette University in Milwaukee convened by Rev. Charles B. Moulinier, SJ, and attended by 35 sisters from congregations dedicated to the hospital apostolate.

  3. 1915

    The first CHA convention is held in Milwaukee.

    1915

    The first CHA convention is held in Milwaukee.

    The first CHA convention was held in Milwaukee June 24-26, 1915. It was attended by 200 sisters, lay nurses and doctors, representing 43 hospitals in 12 states. A constitution and bylaws for the Catholic Hospital Association were adopted at the convention. Among the new association’s stated purposes was, “To advance the general interests of all hospital work, to encourage the spirit of cooperation and mutual helpfulness among hospital workers, to promote by study, conference, discussion, and publication the thoroughness and correct moral tone and practice of medicine.”

  4. 1915

    Fr. Moulinier elected first CHA president.

    1915

    Fr. Moulinier elected first CHA president.

    At the first convention of the Catholic Hospital Association, Rev. Charles B. Moulinier, SJ, was elected as the first president of the association, and headquarters were established in Milwaukee.  The 1915 convention also established a summer school for hospital sisters at Marquette University.  The first year, two courses were offered: clinical pathology and radiology.

  5. 1916

    Sr. M. Esperance Finn, CSJ, elected second vice president of CHA.

    1916

    Sr. M. Esperance Finn, CSJ, elected second vice president of CHA.

    Sr. M. Esperance Finn, CSJ, one of the founding members at the 1914 meeting in St. Paul, Minn., was elected as second vice president of CHA. Although CHA was recognized primarily as a “sisters’ organization,” the rules of the sisters’ religious institutes did not allow them to serve as full-time officers of a national organization. (Photo: Sr. Finn standing next to a commemorative granite stone erected in 1931 on the site of the 1914 meeting.)

  6. 1918

    The association’s name was changed to the Catholic Hospital Association of the United States and Canada.

    1918

    The association’s name was changed to the Catholic Hospital Association of the United States and Canada.

1920s

  1. 1920

    The first issue of Hospital Progress published.

    1920

    The first issue of Hospital Progress published.

    The first issue of Hospital Progress was published. The 22-member editorial board included 17 physicians. Bernard F. McGrath, MD, CHA’s secretary/treasurer, conceived of the journal and its general thrust and provided the name.

  2. 1921

    The code of ethics for Catholic hospitals and health care workers is adopted by CHA.

    1921

    The code of ethics for Catholic hospitals and health care workers is adopted by CHA.

  3. 1924

    Marquette University opens the nation’s first academic program in hospital administration.

    1924

    Marquette University opens the nation’s first academic program in hospital administration.

    Marquette University opened its Hospital College, the nation’s first academic program in hospital administration. Fr. Moulinier had encouraged the university to initiate the program which also included short courses for women religious who had hospital experience but not the requisite undergraduate degree to pursue graduate studies.

  4. 1928

    Rev. Alphonse Schwitalla becomes the second president of CHA.

    1928

    Rev. Alphonse Schwitalla becomes the second president of CHA.

    Rev. Alphonse Schwitalla, SJ, dean of the Medical School of St. Louis University, became president of CHA. Fr. Moulinier remained as administrator and moved CHA headquarters to Chicago.

  5. 1929

    CHA headquarters is moved to St. Louis.

    1929

    CHA headquarters is moved to St. Louis.

1930s

  1. 1931

    CHA develops the Council on Nursing Education.

    1931

    CHA develops the Council on Nursing Education.

    At the suggestion of Sr. Berenice Beck, OSF, CHA developed the Council on Nursing Education to evaluate Catholic schools of nursing and vote on issues related to nursing.  Sr. Beck helped establish Marquette University’s College of Nursing and taught nursing courses at the Catholic University of America.

  2. 1932

    CHA joins with the American Hospital Association and the Protestant Hospital Association to form the Joint Committee of the Three National Hospital Associations.

    1932

    CHA joins with the American Hospital Association and the Protestant Hospital Association to form the Joint Committee of the Three National Hospital Associations.

    CHA joined with the American Hospital Association and the Protestant Hospital Association to form the Joint Committee of the Three National Hospital Associations to ensure that federal legislation dealing with hospitals included the voluntary hospitals and that the successful dual system of public and voluntary hospitals be preserved.

  3. 1934

    The hospital chaplains’ conference is organized.

    1934

    The hospital chaplains’ conference is organized.

  4. 1937

    An undergraduate curriculum in hospital administration is initiated at St. Louis University.

    1937

    An undergraduate curriculum in hospital administration is initiated at St. Louis University.

     

  5. 1939

    The Conference of Bishops’ Representatives is formed to serve as a liaison between episcopal authority and CHA.

    1939

    The Conference of Bishops’ Representatives is formed to serve as a liaison between episcopal authority and CHA.

    (Photo: A meeting of the Conference of Bishops’ Representatives in Chicago, 1946.)

1940s

  1. 1942

    The CHA Administrative Board is developed to coordinate general policy, direct public relations and propose legislation related to health care.

    1942

    The CHA Administrative Board is developed to coordinate general policy, direct public relations and propose legislation related to health care.

    The CHA Administrative Board, composed of the CHA executive board and the executive committee of the bishops’ representatives, was developed to coordinate general policy, direct public relations and propose legislation related to health care. Bishop Karl J. Alter was selected as episcopal chairman.

  2. 1946

    The Hospital Survey and Construction Act (also known as the Hill-Burton Act) is passed.

    1946

    The Hospital Survey and Construction Act (also known as the Hill-Burton Act) is passed.

    The Hospital Survey and Construction Act, better known as the Hill-Burton Act, was passed. The first piece of federal legislation to be conceived and formulated by the U.S. voluntary hospital associations—including CHA—it provided subsidies for the construction of new hospitals based on local need.

  3. 1947

    Rev. John Joseph Flanagan, SJ is named executive director of CHA.

    1947

    Rev. John Joseph Flanagan, SJ is named executive director of CHA.

    Bylaw changes approved at the 1947 convention prescribed a one-year term for CHA’s presidency and the establishment of the office of executive director to supervise the association’s central office and be accountable to the administrative board. Rev. John Joseph Flanagan, SJ, the president of Regis College in Denver, was named as executive director of CHA.

  4. 1948

    CHA is incorporated as a Missouri not-for-profit corporation.

    1948

    CHA is incorporated as a Missouri not-for-profit corporation.

  5. 1949

    CHA’s code for medical ethics, Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Hospitals is published.

    1949

    CHA’s code for medical ethics, Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Hospitals is published.

1950s

  1. 1954

    The Catholic Hospital Association of Canada is established, officially separating from the U.S.-based CHA.

    1954

    The Catholic Hospital Association of Canada is established, officially separating from the U.S.-based CHA.

  2. 1954

    CHA’s new central office building is dedicated.

    1954

    CHA’s new central office building is dedicated.

    CHA’s new central office building was dedicated. Under the leadership of Fr. John Joseph Flanagan, SJ, the central office had grown rapidly, requiring additional office space.

  3. 1956

    CHA presents a series of regional conferences.

    1956

    CHA presents a series of regional conferences.

    CHA presented a series of regional conferences on medico-moral problems, canon and civil law issues, and medical education and research in Catholic hospitals and schools of medicine.

  4. 1958

    CHA to establishes a Department of Continuing Education.

    1958

    CHA to establishes a Department of Continuing Education.

    A grant from the Kellogg Foundation enabled CHA to establish a Department of Continuing Education. With 191 faculty members form St. Louis University and CHA, the program sponsored 16 sessions with a total enrollment of 1,156 in 1958-59.

1960s

  1. 1961

    CHA establishes a department of service to nursing homes.

    1961

    CHA establishes a department of service to nursing homes.

  2. 1965

    A revision to the CHA bylaws opens the association presidency to sisters for the first time.

    1965

    A revision to the CHA bylaws opens the association presidency to sisters for the first time.

    A revision to the CHA bylaws opened the association presidency to sisters for the first time. The association’s administrative board and executive board were combined into one board of trustees.

  3. 1967

    Sr. Mary Brigh Cassidy, OSF, becomes first woman religious to serve as board president.

    1967

    Sr. Mary Brigh Cassidy, OSF, becomes first woman religious to serve as board president.

    Sr. Mary Brigh Cassidy, OSF, became the first woman religious to serve as president of CHA, and John A. Bradley, Ph.D., became the first layperson to be elected to the association’s board of trustees.

  4. 1968

    Rev. Thomas J. Casey, SJ becomes CHA executive director.

    1968

    Rev. Thomas J. Casey, SJ becomes CHA executive director.

    A cerebral hemorrhage forced Fr. John Flanagan, SJ, to resign his post as executive director of CHA, after more than 20 years of service. Rev. Thomas J. Casey, SJ, who had served as Fr. Flanagan’s assistant since 1966, followed him as executive director.

  5. 1969

    CHA’s board approves “Guidelines for Establishing a Department of Religion in a Catholic-Sponsored Hospital.”

    1969

    CHA’s board approves “Guidelines for Establishing a Department of Religion in a Catholic-Sponsored Hospital.”

1970s

  1. 1970

    Sr. Mary Maurita Sengelaub, RSM, becomes the first woman to be named executive director of CHA.

    1970

    Sr. Mary Maurita Sengelaub, RSM, becomes the first woman to be named executive director of CHA.

    Sr. Mary Maurita Sengelaub, RSM, is named executive director of CHA. She is the first woman to hold the position. In 1972, her title was changed to executive vice-president and then to president in 1974.

  2. 1970

    CHA launches Catholic Health Services Leadership Program to help sponsoring groups and their health facilities establish multi-facility health programs.

    1970

    CHA launches Catholic Health Services Leadership Program to help sponsoring groups and their health facilities establish multi-facility health programs.

    CHA launched the Catholic Health Services Leadership Program to help sponsoring groups and their health facilities establish multi-facility health programs on a corporate basis. CHA later published a series of nine models that could be used when sponsoring institutes were establishing health systems.

  3. 1971

    The National Conference of Catholic Bishops alters and approves a revised edition of the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Hospitals.

    1971

    The National Conference of Catholic Bishops alters and approves a revised edition of the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Hospitals.

     

  4. 1975

    CHA creates the Achievement Citation award.

    1975

    CHA creates the Achievement Citation award.

    CHA initiated the Achievement Citation to recognize outstanding programs and services that exemplify the ministry’s commitment to carry on Jesus’ mission of compassion and healing.

  5. 1976

    The Study Committee of the Catholic Health Association is formed to facilitate and evaluate ways that CHA could improve its purpose, mission, and ministry.

    1976

    The Study Committee of the Catholic Health Association is formed to facilitate and evaluate ways that CHA could improve its purpose, mission, and ministry.

    The Study Committee of the Catholic Health Association, composed of laypersons, religious and priests, was formed to facilitate and evaluate ways that CHA could improve its purpose, mission, and ministry. The consulting firm Arthur D. Little, Inc., was commissioned to determine how well members’ expectations were being fulfilled and make recommendations for improvement. 

  6. 1976

    CHA’s office of government services, created in 1973, moves to Washington, D.C.

    1976

    CHA’s office of government services, created in 1973, moves to Washington, D.C.

  7. 1977

    Sr. Helen Kelley, DC is named president of CHA.

    1977

    Sr. Helen Kelley, DC is named president of CHA.

    Sr. Helen Kelley, DC, administrator of Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Binghampton, N.Y., was named president of CHA, succeeding Sr. Maurita Sengelaub who resigned due to illness. When she assumed the presidency, Sr. Kelley also became chairperson of the Study Committee. When the committee completed its work in 1978, she announced her retirement from the presidency.

  8. 1979

    John E. Curley becomes CHA’s first lay chief executive officer.

    1979

    John E. Curley becomes CHA’s first lay chief executive officer.

    John E. Curley, the executive director of the California Association of Catholic Hospitals, became CHA’s first lay chief executive officer, a position he held until he retired in 1998.

  9. 1979

    CHA officially changes its name to the Catholic Health Association of the United States.

    1979

    CHA officially changes its name to the Catholic Health Association of the United States.

    CHA officially changed its name to the Catholic Health Association of the United States, following one of the recommendations of the Study Committee report.

1980s

  1. 1980

    CHA publishes the Evaluative Criteria for Catholic Health Care Facilities to enable members to evaluate their mission effectiveness.

    1980

    CHA publishes the Evaluative Criteria for Catholic Health Care Facilities to enable members to evaluate their mission effectiveness.

    CHA published the Evaluative Criteria for Catholic Health Care Facilities to enable members to evaluate their mission effectiveness. In their 1981 pastoral letter Health and Health Care, the U.S. bishops cited the Evaluative Criteria as a “commendable” effort because it was designed to draw attention to questions related to Catholic identity.

  2. 1981

    CHA moves into a new headquarters building on Woodson Road in St. Louis.

    1981

    CHA moves into a new headquarters building on Woodson Road in St. Louis.

  3. 1983

    CHA board authorizes the first phase of a Study of the Feasibility of Alternative Sponsorship of Catholic Health Care Institutions and Services.

    1983

    CHA board authorizes the first phase of a Study of the Feasibility of Alternative Sponsorship of Catholic Health Care Institutions and Services.

    The CHA board authorized the first phase of a Study of the Feasibility of Alternative Sponsorship of Catholic Health Care Institutions and Services, based on one of the recommendations of 1977 Study Committee.  

  4. 1984

    The title of the association’s journal changes from Hospital Progress to Health Progress.

    1984

    The title of the association’s journal changes from Hospital Progress to Health Progress.

  5. 1984

    The Task Force on Health Care of the Poor is established by CHA’s Board of Trustees.

    1984

    The Task Force on Health Care of the Poor is established by CHA’s Board of Trustees.

    The Task Force on Health Care of the Poor is established by CHA’s Board of Trustees. The task force’s report, No Room in the Marketplace: The Health Care of the Poor, released in 1986, recommended ways for the ministry, the Church as a whole, and the federal government to health address the problems of the nation’s health care poor. The task force favored a long-term strategy that included federally mandated universal health insurance.

  6. 1985

    The association introduces its newspaper, Catholic Health World, published twice a month.

    1985

    The association introduces its newspaper, Catholic Health World, published twice a month.

  7. 1986

    CHA launches a pilot program to test lay sponsorship of Catholic health care.

    1986

    CHA launches a pilot program to test lay sponsorship of Catholic health care.

    CHA launched a pilot program to test lay sponsorship of Catholic health care to clarify the status and options of sponsoring groups under canon law; to help establish proper relationships among the local bishop(s), the sponsoring group, and the health care facility; and to set up a process for the annual review of the sponsor’s stewardship.

  8. 1986

    CHA establishes Task Force on Long-term Care Policy.

    1986

    CHA establishes Task Force on Long-term Care Policy.

    CHA established the Task Force on Long-term Care Policy. Its 1988 report, A Time to Be Old, A Time to Flourish: The Special Needs of the Elderly-at-Risk, described the state of the long-term care system in the United States and recommended federal programs to help finance health care for the aged.

  9. 1987

    Pope John Paul II addresses a special CHA membership assembly in Phoenix.

    1987

    Pope John Paul II addresses a special CHA membership assembly in Phoenix.

  10. 1989

    CHA publishes the "Social Accountability Budget: A process for Planning and Reporting Community Service in a Time of Fiscal Constraint."

    1989

    CHA publishes the "Social Accountability Budget: A process for Planning and Reporting Community Service in a Time of Fiscal Constraint."

    CHA published the Social Accountability Budget: A process for Planning and Reporting Community Service in a Time of Fiscal Constraint. It represented the first step in helping member organizations provide the accounting for social services that critics and Congress sought.

1990s

  1. 1990

    The CHA Board of Trustees endorses “Principles for Systemic Healthcare Reform.”

    1990

    The CHA Board of Trustees endorses “Principles for Systemic Healthcare Reform.”

    The CHA Board of Trustees endorsed the “Principles for Systemic Healthcare Reform” as the basis for any systemic reform. The principles were the product of the association’s Catholic Leadership Symposium on Systemic Reform of the National Healthcare System held in late 1989 at Georgetown University.

  2. 1991

    A high-level CHA task force examines charity care and community benefit standards.

    1991

    A high-level CHA task force examines charity care and community benefit standards.

    A high-level CHA task force on tax exemption determined that a lack of clear, consistent standards for charity care and community benefit made it difficult to demonstrate Catholic health care’s comprehensive community role.

  3. 1991

    CHA publishes the book Food for the Journey: Theological Foundations of the Catholic Healthcare Ministry.

    1991

    CHA publishes the book Food for the Journey: Theological Foundations of the Catholic Healthcare Ministry.

    CHA published the book Food for the Journey: Theological Foundations of the Catholic Healthcare Ministry by Sr. Juliana Casey, IHM. This theological reflection proved to be one of the most sought-after formation resources over the next two decades.

  4. 1991

    CHA launches an educational effort for articulating advance directives.

    1991

    CHA launches an educational effort for articulating advance directives.

    To prepare members for the requirements of the Patient Self-Determination Act, CHA launched a multi-pronged educational effort for member organizations that included effective and understandable forms for articulating advance directives or for assigning responsibility for health care decisions to another party through a durable power of attorney for health care.

  5. 1992

    The CHA Board adopts the landmark report “Setting Relationships Right: A Working Proposal for Systemic Healthcare Reform.”

    1992

    The CHA Board adopts the landmark report “Setting Relationships Right: A Working Proposal for Systemic Healthcare Reform.”

    The CHA Board of Trustees adopted the landmark report “Setting Relationships Right: A Working Proposal for Systemic Healthcare Reform,” which was the work of the association’s Leadership Task Force on National Health Policy Reform, chaired by Sr. Bernice Coreil, DC.

  6. 1992

    Board approves statement of CHA standards for community benefit.

    1992

    Board approves statement of CHA standards for community benefit.

    Based on the recommendations of a CHA task force on tax exemption, the association’s Board of Trustees approved a statement of CHA standards for community benefit and urged members to adopt them.

  7. 1993

    CHA Opens Romanian Home for Children

    1993

    CHA Opens Romanian Home for Children

    After many construction delays and supply shortages, CHA opened its first residence for disabled children in Romania, the Casa of the Mother of God. The project was funded through CHA’s “Fund for the Nameless Children of Romania.”

  8. 1994

    Sr. Bernice Coreil, DC, chairperson of CHA’s Leadership Task Force on National Health Policy Reform, addresses a White House gathering.

    1994

    Sr. Bernice Coreil, DC, chairperson of CHA’s Leadership Task Force on National Health Policy Reform, addresses a White House gathering.

    Sr. Bernice Coreil, DC, chairperson of CHA’s Leadership Task Force on National Health Policy Reform, was one of three representatives of health care providers chosen to address a White House gathering of 200 health care professionals and to introduce President Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton.

  9. 1994

    CHA introduces the leadership competency model “Transformational Leadership for the Healing Ministry: Competencies for the Future.”

    1994

    CHA introduces the leadership competency model “Transformational Leadership for the Healing Ministry: Competencies for the Future.”

    At the annual Catholic Health Assembly, CHA introduced the leadership competency model “Transformational Leadership for the Healing Ministry: Competencies for the Future,” the result of a nine-month study conducted by the association in collaboration with DePaul University’s Center for Applied Social Research and Hay McBer.  The research identified that outstanding leaders in Catholic health care shared the same core competencies as outstanding executives in other industries and were distinguished by a deep spirituality and appreciation for positive interpersonal relationships.

  10. 1994

    CHA holds first official program for sponsors of Catholic health care organizations.

    1994

    CHA holds first official program for sponsors of Catholic health care organizations.

    CHA held its first official program for sponsors of Catholic health care organizations to keep them aware of rapid changes in the ministry, processes for creating new forms of sponsorship and relevant canon law.

  11. 1994

    CHA and six other organizations form National Coalition on Catholic Health Ministry.

    1994

    CHA and six other organizations form National Coalition on Catholic Health Ministry.

    CHA and six other leadership organizations united as the National Coalition on Catholic Health Ministry. Other coalition members included the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, and Catholic Charities USA. In 1995 the coalition issued Catholic Health Ministry in Transition, a Handbook for Responsible Leadership.

  12. 1995

    Joseph Cardinal Bernardin writes pastoral letter, “A Sign of Hope.”

    1995

    Joseph Cardinal Bernardin writes pastoral letter, “A Sign of Hope.”

    In his pastoral letter titled “A Sign of Hope,” Joseph Cardinal Bernardin, Archbishop of Chicago, proposed a time of “refounding” for Catholic health care when some were talking about “the beginning of the end.”

  13. 1995

    CHA joins three organizations to form “New Covenant” initiative.

    1995

    CHA joins three organizations to form “New Covenant” initiative.

    “New Covenant,” a bold, multiphase initiative by three organizations—CHA, the National Coalition on Catholic Health Care Ministry, and Consolidated Catholic Health Care—began with a national convocation in Chicago that brought together 170 Catholic health care leaders. The national meeting was followed by 15 regional and local meetings, working toward the goal of a “refounded ministry” based on commitments to new action strategies for collaboration among Catholic organizations.

  14. 1995

    First major revision of the Ethical and Religious Directives is published.

    1995

    First major revision of the Ethical and Religious Directives is published.

    The first major revision of the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services since 1971 was published. The revised document was divided into six sections, each with an introductory essay on the Scriptural, theological and social dimensions of the section’s theme, followed by specific directives.

  15. 1996

    CHA publishes "In Their Own Words: An Assessment of Evolving Arrangements by the Sponsors Who Use Them."

    1996

    CHA publishes "In Their Own Words: An Assessment of Evolving Arrangements by the Sponsors Who Use Them."

    CHA published In Their Own Words: An Assessment of Evolving Arrangements by the Sponsors Who Use Them in which women religious gave pros and cons of new sponsorship models and described the soul searching that went into adopting them.

  16. 1996

    CHA publishes “A Call to Care: The Women Who Built Catholic Health Care in America."

    1996

    CHA publishes “A Call to Care: The Women Who Built Catholic Health Care in America."

    The documentary and companion book, “A Call to Care: The Women Who Built Catholic Health Care in America,” produced by CHA, debuted at the annual Catholic Health Assembly in San Antonio, Texas.

  17. 1996

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which CHA had strongly supported, was passed into law.

    1996

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which CHA had strongly supported, was passed into law.

  18. 1997

    Congress passes the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, which CHA strongly supported.

    1997

    Congress passes the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, which CHA strongly supported.

     

  19. 1998

    Rev. Michael D. Place, STD, becomes the eighth president and chief executive officer of CHA.

    1998

    Rev. Michael D. Place, STD, becomes the eighth president and chief executive officer of CHA.

    Rev. Michael D. Place, STD, a widely respected theologian and church policy expert, became the eighth president and chief executive officer of CHA. For 14 years, Fr. Place had served Joseph Cardinal Bernardin of Chicago as consul for policy development and as a member of the archbishop’s cabinet.

  20. 1998

    CHA membership approves new membership categories.

    1998

    CHA membership approves new membership categories.

    At the annual Catholic Health Assembly, the membership of CHA approved new membership categories to reflect the growing prominence of Catholic health systems, the proliferation of integrated delivery networks and the diversity of health care partnerships.

  21. 1999

    CHA convenes theologians to explore a need for a theology of sponsorship.

    1999

    CHA convenes theologians to explore a need for a theology of sponsorship.

    Recognizing a need for a theology of sponsorship, CHA convened a blue-ribbon group of theologians to explore the topic in depth. The work of the Sponsorship of Catholic Ministries Think Tank was published in 2005.

2000s

  1. 2000

    CHA launches “Living Our Promises, Acting on Faith” program.

    2000

    CHA launches “Living Our Promises, Acting on Faith” program.

    CHA launched “Living Our Promises, Acting on Faith,” a program to help members measure and demonstrate how well they lived out the constitutive elements of Catholic identity described in the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services.

  2. 2001

    CHA publishes the “Shared Statement of Identity for the Catholic Health Ministry.”

    2001

    CHA publishes the “Shared Statement of Identity for the Catholic Health Ministry.”

    Based on input from Church and ministry leaders and tested through a series of listening sessions and meetings across the country, CHA developed and published the “Shared Statement of Identity for the Catholic Health Ministry.”

  3. 2002

    CHA initiates annual Rome retreat for executives and trustees.

    2002

    CHA initiates annual Rome retreat for executives and trustees.

    CHA initiated an annual retreat in Rome for executives and trustees of Catholic health systems. The program included lectures on Catholic tradition and theology, visits to various Vatican offices, a papal audience, and a visit to Assisi. The program continues to be one of the association’s most popular educational offerings.

  4. 2002

    CHA-commissioned report, “A Commitment to Caring: The Role of Catholic Hospitals in the Health Care Safety Net," is released.

    2002

    CHA-commissioned report, “A Commitment to Caring: The Role of Catholic Hospitals in the Health Care Safety Net," is released.

    The report of a CHA-commissioned study of community safety nets, “A Commitment to Caring: The Role of Catholic Hospitals in the Health Care Safety Net,” demonstrated that a multitude of services performed by Catholic hospitals had long served as an integral part of community safety nets for vulnerable populations.

  5. 2002

    CHA launches annual Catholic Health Care Advocacy Days.

    2002

    CHA launches annual Catholic Health Care Advocacy Days.

    CHA launched what would become the annual Catholic Health Care Advocacy Days (now the Catholic Legislative Advocacy Conference), bringing health care leaders from the ministry to Washington, D.C., to meeting with members of Congress and their staffs.

  6. 2003

    CHA joins with other national organizations in the campaign, “Cover the Uninsured Week.”

    2003

    CHA joins with other national organizations in the campaign, “Cover the Uninsured Week.”

    CHA joined with other national organizations in the campaign, “Cover the Uninsured Week” sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The campaign was held each year through 2010.
    (Photo: A panel presents as Cover the Uninsured Week 2004)

  7. 2005

    Sr. Carol Keehan, DC, is named CHA's ninth president and chief executive officer.

    2005

    Sr. Carol Keehan, DC, is named CHA's ninth president and chief executive officer.

    Sr. Carol Keehan, DC, was named the ninth president and chief executive officer of the Catholic Health Association, the third woman religious to head the association in its 90-year history.  Sr. Keehan had previously served for 15 years as president and chief executive officer of Providence Hospital in Washington, D.C., and board chair of Ascension Health’s Sacred Heart Health System in Pensacola, Fla. 

  8. 2006

    Sen. Charles Grassley commends CHA's community benefit guidelines.

    2006

    Sen. Charles Grassley commends CHA's community benefit guidelines.

    In a letter to CHA president and chief executive officer Sr. Carol Keehan, DC, Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, chairman of the Senate Committee on Finance commended CHA’s Guide for Planning and Reporting Community Benefit writing that it “is a valuable resource and should be utilized by all tax-exempt hospitals.”

  9. 2006

    CHA sponsors conference, “Theological Dialogue on Medically Administered Nutrition and Hydration.”

    2006

    CHA sponsors conference, “Theological Dialogue on Medically Administered Nutrition and Hydration.”

    CHA sponsored a major conference titled “Theological Dialogue on Medically Administered Nutrition and Hydration.” Participants came from Catholic health care organizations and the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.
    (Photo: Fr. Albert S. Moraczewski, OP, PhD, president emeritus, The National Catholic Bioethics Center, and Sr. Carol Keehan, DC, CHA president and chief executive officer, participate in a table discussion at the 2006 CHA-sponsored "Dialogue on Medically Administered Nutrition and Hydration.")

  10. 2007

    CHA announces overwhelming member adoption of its revised guidelines for community benefit reporting.

    2007

    CHA announces overwhelming member adoption of its revised guidelines for community benefit reporting.

    CHA announced in a news release that its revised guidelines for community benefit reporting had been adopted by 95 percent of member health systems and 90 percent of member hospitals.

  11. 2007

    CHA newspaper ad announces over 5.7 billion dollars in community benefit services.

    2007

    CHA newspaper ad announces over 5.7 billion dollars in community benefit services.

    A CHA ad in national newspapers such as USAToday and Our Sunday Visitor announced that Catholic-sponsored not-for-profit hospitals had contributed more than $5.7 billion in services identified as community benefit in the previous fiscal year.

  12. 2007

    CHA publishes three new resources for sponsors and trustees.

    2007

    CHA publishes three new resources for sponsors and trustees.

    Three new resources for sponsors and trustees were published by CHA: One Vine, Different Branches: Sponsorship and Governance in Catholic Ministries; Core Elements for Leaders of Catholic Ministry: A Reflection Guide; and Personal Development Plan for Leaders in Catholic Ministries: Sponsor-Trustee-Executive.

  13. 2007

    CHA publishes first issue of Health Care Ethics USA.

    2007

    CHA publishes first issue of Health Care Ethics USA.

    CHA added to its bioethical resources for the ministry by assuming editorial responsibility for a quarterly publication, Health Care Ethics USA.

  14. 2008

    CHA releases “Our Vision for U.S. Health Care,” a set of values-based criteria for a redesigned health care system.

    2008

    CHA releases “Our Vision for U.S. Health Care,” a set of values-based criteria for a redesigned health care system.

    Based on several years of work by a CHA task force, CHA released the document “Our Vision for U.S. Health Care,” a set of values-based criteria for a redesigned health care system. The association also provided member organizations with a detailed guide for hosting community dialogue meetings to build grassroots support for reform.

  15. 2009

    CHA’s launches “I Can’t Wait” campaign for health reform.

    2009

    CHA’s launches “I Can’t Wait” campaign for health reform.

    CHA’s “I Can’t Wait” campaign elicited hundreds of photos of people in- and outside Catholic health care holding signs beginning with the words, “I can’t wait…” and completed with their hopes and expectations for health reform. The campaign was featured on ABC Nightly News.

2010s

  1. 2010

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is signed into law.

    2010

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is signed into law.

    Congress passed and President Barak Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law. Sr. Carol Keehan, DC, CHA president and chief executive officer, calls it “a victory for the American people, for the poor, for families struggling to obtain coverage and for the long-term strength of our health care system.”

  2. 2010

    CHA introduces a new logo and tagline, “A Passionate Voice for Compassionate Care.”

    2010

    CHA introduces a new logo and tagline, “A Passionate Voice for Compassionate Care.”

  3. 2010

    Sr. Carol Keehan, DC, CHA’s president and chief executive officer, named to Time Magazine’s list of the 100 Most Influential People in the World.

    2010

    Sr. Carol Keehan, DC, CHA’s president and chief executive officer, named to Time Magazine’s list of the 100 Most Influential People in the World.

  4. 2011

    CHA’s Board of Trustees begins a study of membership criteria.

    2011

    CHA’s Board of Trustees begins a study of membership criteria.

    With several member organizations restructuring, CHA’s Board of Trustees begins a study of membership criteria. The recommendations of the Membership Task Force will go to association members for a vote at the 2015 Catholic Health Assembly.

  5. 2011

    CHA member organizations donate 10.1 million dollars to support the rebuilding of hospital in Haiti.

    2011

    CHA member organizations donate 10.1 million dollars to support the rebuilding of hospital in Haiti.

    CHA member organizations donate $10.1 million to support the rebuilding of St. Francis de Sales Hospital in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, which was destroyed by the January 2010 earthquake.

  6. 2011

    CHA convenes first global health care summit.

    2011

    CHA convenes first global health care summit.

    Following the annual Catholic Health Assembly in June in Atlanta, CHA convenes the first global health care summit, focusing on the ministry’s activities to improve health status in the developing world.

  7. 2013

    CHA enlists as a charter member of Enroll America.

    2013

    CHA enlists as a charter member of Enroll America.

    CHA enlists as a charter member of Enroll America to educate hard-to-reach audiences about eligibility for health care coverage under the Affordable Care Act and how to access it.

  8. 2013

    CHA publishes “Caritas in Communion: Theological Foundations of Catholic Health Care.”

    2013

    CHA publishes “Caritas in Communion: Theological Foundations of Catholic Health Care.”

    The white paper “Caritas in Communion: Theological Foundations of Catholic Health Care,” authored by theologian M. Therese Lysaught, was published by CHA. The paper was commissioned as part of the association’s membership study.  

  9. 2014

    CHA announces a new program of sponsor formation in 2015.

    2014

    CHA announces a new program of sponsor formation in 2015.

    CHA announced it will begin offering a program of sponsor formation in 2015. The new program builds upon two formation programs that had been created and operated by groups of Catholic health care providers: the Collaborative Formation Program for Public Juridic Persons that had served seven health systems with PJP sponsorship models, and the Collaborative Sponsor Formation Program that served 12 systems with various sponsorship models.

  10. 2014

    CHA launches “100 Days of Prayer” social media campaign for the sick and caregivers.

    2014

    CHA launches “100 Days of Prayer” social media campaign for the sick and caregivers.

    CHA launched “100 Days of Prayer,” a social media campaign in celebration of the association’s centennial. The 100 days began November 3 and will culminated February 11, 2015, World Day of the Sick. Thousands of people signed up at CHA’s website to pray and ask for prayers for persons who are sick and injured and their caregivers.