Kathleen Parker and Bob Woodward
Pulitzer-Prize Winning Journalists, The Washington Post

Kathleen Parker and Bob Woodward

Monday, June 6, 1:30 p.m.

Kathleen Parker is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The Washington Post, writing twice-weekly on politics and culture. The most widely syndicated columnist in the country, her 750-word essays appear in more than 450 newspapers across the country, which translates to about 80 million print readers and countless millions online. A renowned political analyst and commentator, in a retrospective study of political pundits' predictions, Parker scored highest for accuracy.

Parker is a popular commentator on news shows and a regular guest on NBC's Meet the Press, as well as MSNBC's Hardball and Fox News' Media Buzz. In 2010, she launched and was co-anchor of CNN's prime time news show, Parker Spitzer. Parker approaches politics with the common sense – and humor – so often lacking in DC's political and media culture. She is quick-witted, funny and delightfully sassy. Describing herself as "slightly to the right of center" politically, she addresses politics, culture and contemporary issues.

A columnist since 1987, Parker has worked for five newspapers, from Florida to California, and has written for several magazines, including The Weekly Standard, TIME, Newsweek, Town & Country, Cosmopolitan, and Fortune Small Business. Parker joined The Washington Post Writers Group in 2006, following 11 years with Tribune Media Services.

In 2010, she became co-host of CNN's Parker Spitzer, along with former New York governor Eliot Spitzer. She left the show in 2011 to focus on her writing. She is also the author of Save the Males: Why Men Matter, Why Women Should Care.

With a selection of political opinion columns, Kathleen Parker won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for "her perceptive, often witty columns on an array of political and moral issues, gracefully sharing the experiences and values that lead her to unpredictable conclusions." She is also the 1993 winner of the H.L. Mencken writing award presented by The Baltimore Sun.

The Week magazine named her one of the nation's "Top Five Columnists" in 2004 and 2005.

Former CIA director and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates wished he’d recruited Woodward into the CIA, "His ability to get people to talk about stuff they shouldn’t be talking about is just extraordinary and may be unique." 

Therein lays the genius of Bob Woodward – a journalistic icon who gained international attention when he and Carl Bernstein broke the deeply disturbing news of the Watergate scandal. The book they wrote – All the President's Men – won a Pulitzer Prize.

Watergate's theme of secret government is a common thread throughout Woodward's career that spawned 18 books – all went on to become national bestsellers – 12 of them #1 – more than any other contemporary nonfiction author. In the process Woodward became the ultimate inside man. No one else in political investigative journalism has the clout, respect, and reputation of Woodward. He has a way of getting insiders to open up - both on the record and off the record – in ways that reveal an intimate yet sweeping portrayal of Washington and the budget wrangling, political infighting, how we fight wars, the price of politics, how presidents lead, the homeland security efforts, and so much more. His work is meticulous and draws on internal memos, classified documents, meeting notes and hundreds of hours of interviews with most of the key players, including the president.

As a speaker, Woodward pulls the curtain back on Washington and its leaders to captivate audiences with stories that are sometimes surprising, at times shocking, and always fascinating. He blends stories that are both up to the minute and from the past (to provide historical context). Woodward speaks as he writes - crisp and concise – and helps people get behind the spin to understand what’s really going on in the halls of power in an age of 24-hour news, social media, and snarky politics.

Professionally, Woodward is currently associate editor for The Washington Post http://washingtonpost.com/ where he’s worked since 1971. He has won nearly every American journalism award, and the Post won the 1973 Pulitzer Prize for his work with Carl Bernstein on the Watergate scandal. In addition, Woodward was the main reporter for the Post’s articles on the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks that won the National Affairs Pulitzer Prize in 2002. Woodward won the Gerald R. Ford Prize for Distinguished Reporting on the Presidency in 2003.

The Weekly Standard called Woodward "the best pure reporter of his generation, perhaps ever." In 2003, Albert Hunt of The Wall Street Journal called Woodward "the most celebrated journalist of our age." In listing the all-time 100 best non-fiction books, Time magazine has called All the President's Men, by Bernstein and Woodward, "Perhaps the most influential piece of journalism in history." 

Woodward has co-authored or authored twelve #1 national best-selling non-fiction books. They are: All the President's Men (1974) and The Final Days (1976), both Watergate books, co-authored with Bernstein. The Brethren: Inside the Supreme Court (1979) co-authored with Scott Armstrong, Wired: The Short Life and Fast Times of John Belushi (1984), Veil: The Secret Wars of the CIA 1981-87 (1987), The Commanders (1991), The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House (1994), Shadow: Five Presidents and the Legacy of Watergate (1999), Bush at War (2002), Plan of Attack (2004), State of Denial: Bush at War Part III (2006), and Obama's Wars (2010). Woodward's other national bestselling books: The Secret Man: The Story of Watergate's Deep Throat (2005), The Choice (1996), Maestro: Greenspan’s Fed and the American Boom (2000), The War Within: A Secret White House History (2006-2008) (2008), The Price of Politics (2012) and The Last of the President's Men (2015). Newsweek magazine has excerpted six of Woodward's books in headline-making cover stories; "60 Minutes" has done pieces on seven of his books; three of his books have been made into feature films.

Woodward was born March 26, 1943 in Illinois. He graduated from Yale University in 1965 and served five years as a communications officer in the U.S. Navy before beginning his journalism career at the Montgomery County (Maryland) Sentinel, where he was a reporter for one year before joining the Post.